bits n pieces
bits n pieces
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National Dog Day
National Dog Day
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robmcconnell:

Mill Condensed first prints. I finished my wood type last week and today I ran it through on the press. It worked much better than I expected which is good. I can’t wait to print some more with it. As a bonus I’ve included some of the sketches for Mill. 
robmcconnell:

Mill Condensed first prints. I finished my wood type last week and today I ran it through on the press. It worked much better than I expected which is good. I can’t wait to print some more with it. As a bonus I’ve included some of the sketches for Mill. 
robmcconnell:

Mill Condensed first prints. I finished my wood type last week and today I ran it through on the press. It worked much better than I expected which is good. I can’t wait to print some more with it. As a bonus I’ve included some of the sketches for Mill. 
robmcconnell:

Mill Condensed first prints. I finished my wood type last week and today I ran it through on the press. It worked much better than I expected which is good. I can’t wait to print some more with it. As a bonus I’ve included some of the sketches for Mill. 
robmcconnell:

Mill Condensed first prints. I finished my wood type last week and today I ran it through on the press. It worked much better than I expected which is good. I can’t wait to print some more with it. As a bonus I’ve included some of the sketches for Mill. 
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menick:

Got a healed flickr of the mandala i did a month ago💥 @powerlinetattoosupplies #keithbmachineworks #powerlinetattoosupplies #uktta #tattoos #tattoopen #tattoosnob #tattooworkers #niorkz #custom #mandala #cnc #cnctubes #flor #inksav #inked #ig #streetteamdandy
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chicagoif:

Captives by @Quayola - CG Geological Formations as Life-Size ‘Unfinished’ Sculptures
Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures by Quayola and a contemporary homage to Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The project explores tensions and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. In this series mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations, endlessly evolving and morphing into classical figures resulting into life-size ‘unfinished’ sculptures.

“In every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood before me, shaped, and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it. The best artist has that thought alone which is contained within the marble shell; the sculptor’s hand can only break the spell to free the figures slumbering in the stone. The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection. Michelangelo (1501)”
The project is comprised of a number of different iterations, tools and processes. Starting off with the building models of existing sculptures using zBrush, running them through custom vvvv softwares, exporting and finally producing the physical sculptures milled by a robot. The installation also includes animated scenes, rendered using custom software and finally edited for the video installation sequenced across 6 hd screens with each having its own audio channel.
For this project Quayola wanted to use software that would produce immediate feedback and have a realtime response. Since traditional 3d packages tend to cripple the flow, Quayola wanted something where he could have a “conversation” with the model, a bit like a sculptor would have with clay or stone. There is an action and an immediate response.
The software is built using VVVV through a series of custom nodes and DX11 shaders, and integrated in the Dedalo framework CAN covered about few weeks back. The core code for handling the geometry is done by Matt Swoboda and Juliet Vuillet, while all the system and rendering is done by Natan Sinigaglia (within the Dedalo framework). The software itself runs on two machines, the first handling a noise engine, presets and control for all parameters, while the second is handling the actual rendering. The noise engine is used to control all the parameters in the software. Each parameter can be mapped on a given output of the noise engine. The engine does not produces textures but directly works with functions that get compiled into a shader.
“For centuries, Chinese scholars have contemplated the oddly shaped stones that became known as “scholar’s rocks”. Their shapes might evoke ever-changing associations and their surfaces convey a sense of millennia of exposure to nature. Yet it remains unknown to what extent the “natural” shapes of these stones have been manipulated, an artificiality enhanced by the wood or stone pedestals created for them. Their extraordinary beauty and their enigmatic mysteriousness can be seen as a conceptual model for contemporary art practices working on the complex relationship between the authentic and the manipulated – the figurative and the abstract. – Tommaso Franzolini on Captives”
chicagoif:

Captives by @Quayola - CG Geological Formations as Life-Size ‘Unfinished’ Sculptures
Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures by Quayola and a contemporary homage to Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The project explores tensions and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. In this series mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations, endlessly evolving and morphing into classical figures resulting into life-size ‘unfinished’ sculptures.

“In every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood before me, shaped, and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it. The best artist has that thought alone which is contained within the marble shell; the sculptor’s hand can only break the spell to free the figures slumbering in the stone. The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection. Michelangelo (1501)”
The project is comprised of a number of different iterations, tools and processes. Starting off with the building models of existing sculptures using zBrush, running them through custom vvvv softwares, exporting and finally producing the physical sculptures milled by a robot. The installation also includes animated scenes, rendered using custom software and finally edited for the video installation sequenced across 6 hd screens with each having its own audio channel.
For this project Quayola wanted to use software that would produce immediate feedback and have a realtime response. Since traditional 3d packages tend to cripple the flow, Quayola wanted something where he could have a “conversation” with the model, a bit like a sculptor would have with clay or stone. There is an action and an immediate response.
The software is built using VVVV through a series of custom nodes and DX11 shaders, and integrated in the Dedalo framework CAN covered about few weeks back. The core code for handling the geometry is done by Matt Swoboda and Juliet Vuillet, while all the system and rendering is done by Natan Sinigaglia (within the Dedalo framework). The software itself runs on two machines, the first handling a noise engine, presets and control for all parameters, while the second is handling the actual rendering. The noise engine is used to control all the parameters in the software. Each parameter can be mapped on a given output of the noise engine. The engine does not produces textures but directly works with functions that get compiled into a shader.
“For centuries, Chinese scholars have contemplated the oddly shaped stones that became known as “scholar’s rocks”. Their shapes might evoke ever-changing associations and their surfaces convey a sense of millennia of exposure to nature. Yet it remains unknown to what extent the “natural” shapes of these stones have been manipulated, an artificiality enhanced by the wood or stone pedestals created for them. Their extraordinary beauty and their enigmatic mysteriousness can be seen as a conceptual model for contemporary art practices working on the complex relationship between the authentic and the manipulated – the figurative and the abstract. – Tommaso Franzolini on Captives”
chicagoif:

Captives by @Quayola - CG Geological Formations as Life-Size ‘Unfinished’ Sculptures
Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures by Quayola and a contemporary homage to Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The project explores tensions and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. In this series mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations, endlessly evolving and morphing into classical figures resulting into life-size ‘unfinished’ sculptures.

“In every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood before me, shaped, and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it. The best artist has that thought alone which is contained within the marble shell; the sculptor’s hand can only break the spell to free the figures slumbering in the stone. The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection. Michelangelo (1501)”
The project is comprised of a number of different iterations, tools and processes. Starting off with the building models of existing sculptures using zBrush, running them through custom vvvv softwares, exporting and finally producing the physical sculptures milled by a robot. The installation also includes animated scenes, rendered using custom software and finally edited for the video installation sequenced across 6 hd screens with each having its own audio channel.
For this project Quayola wanted to use software that would produce immediate feedback and have a realtime response. Since traditional 3d packages tend to cripple the flow, Quayola wanted something where he could have a “conversation” with the model, a bit like a sculptor would have with clay or stone. There is an action and an immediate response.
The software is built using VVVV through a series of custom nodes and DX11 shaders, and integrated in the Dedalo framework CAN covered about few weeks back. The core code for handling the geometry is done by Matt Swoboda and Juliet Vuillet, while all the system and rendering is done by Natan Sinigaglia (within the Dedalo framework). The software itself runs on two machines, the first handling a noise engine, presets and control for all parameters, while the second is handling the actual rendering. The noise engine is used to control all the parameters in the software. Each parameter can be mapped on a given output of the noise engine. The engine does not produces textures but directly works with functions that get compiled into a shader.
“For centuries, Chinese scholars have contemplated the oddly shaped stones that became known as “scholar’s rocks”. Their shapes might evoke ever-changing associations and their surfaces convey a sense of millennia of exposure to nature. Yet it remains unknown to what extent the “natural” shapes of these stones have been manipulated, an artificiality enhanced by the wood or stone pedestals created for them. Their extraordinary beauty and their enigmatic mysteriousness can be seen as a conceptual model for contemporary art practices working on the complex relationship between the authentic and the manipulated – the figurative and the abstract. – Tommaso Franzolini on Captives”
chicagoif:

Captives by @Quayola - CG Geological Formations as Life-Size ‘Unfinished’ Sculptures
Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures by Quayola and a contemporary homage to Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The project explores tensions and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. In this series mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations, endlessly evolving and morphing into classical figures resulting into life-size ‘unfinished’ sculptures.

“In every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood before me, shaped, and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it. The best artist has that thought alone which is contained within the marble shell; the sculptor’s hand can only break the spell to free the figures slumbering in the stone. The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection. Michelangelo (1501)”
The project is comprised of a number of different iterations, tools and processes. Starting off with the building models of existing sculptures using zBrush, running them through custom vvvv softwares, exporting and finally producing the physical sculptures milled by a robot. The installation also includes animated scenes, rendered using custom software and finally edited for the video installation sequenced across 6 hd screens with each having its own audio channel.
For this project Quayola wanted to use software that would produce immediate feedback and have a realtime response. Since traditional 3d packages tend to cripple the flow, Quayola wanted something where he could have a “conversation” with the model, a bit like a sculptor would have with clay or stone. There is an action and an immediate response.
The software is built using VVVV through a series of custom nodes and DX11 shaders, and integrated in the Dedalo framework CAN covered about few weeks back. The core code for handling the geometry is done by Matt Swoboda and Juliet Vuillet, while all the system and rendering is done by Natan Sinigaglia (within the Dedalo framework). The software itself runs on two machines, the first handling a noise engine, presets and control for all parameters, while the second is handling the actual rendering. The noise engine is used to control all the parameters in the software. Each parameter can be mapped on a given output of the noise engine. The engine does not produces textures but directly works with functions that get compiled into a shader.
“For centuries, Chinese scholars have contemplated the oddly shaped stones that became known as “scholar’s rocks”. Their shapes might evoke ever-changing associations and their surfaces convey a sense of millennia of exposure to nature. Yet it remains unknown to what extent the “natural” shapes of these stones have been manipulated, an artificiality enhanced by the wood or stone pedestals created for them. Their extraordinary beauty and their enigmatic mysteriousness can be seen as a conceptual model for contemporary art practices working on the complex relationship between the authentic and the manipulated – the figurative and the abstract. – Tommaso Franzolini on Captives”
chicagoif:

Captives by @Quayola - CG Geological Formations as Life-Size ‘Unfinished’ Sculptures
Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures by Quayola and a contemporary homage to Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The project explores tensions and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. In this series mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations, endlessly evolving and morphing into classical figures resulting into life-size ‘unfinished’ sculptures.

“In every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood before me, shaped, and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it. The best artist has that thought alone which is contained within the marble shell; the sculptor’s hand can only break the spell to free the figures slumbering in the stone. The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection. Michelangelo (1501)”
The project is comprised of a number of different iterations, tools and processes. Starting off with the building models of existing sculptures using zBrush, running them through custom vvvv softwares, exporting and finally producing the physical sculptures milled by a robot. The installation also includes animated scenes, rendered using custom software and finally edited for the video installation sequenced across 6 hd screens with each having its own audio channel.
For this project Quayola wanted to use software that would produce immediate feedback and have a realtime response. Since traditional 3d packages tend to cripple the flow, Quayola wanted something where he could have a “conversation” with the model, a bit like a sculptor would have with clay or stone. There is an action and an immediate response.
The software is built using VVVV through a series of custom nodes and DX11 shaders, and integrated in the Dedalo framework CAN covered about few weeks back. The core code for handling the geometry is done by Matt Swoboda and Juliet Vuillet, while all the system and rendering is done by Natan Sinigaglia (within the Dedalo framework). The software itself runs on two machines, the first handling a noise engine, presets and control for all parameters, while the second is handling the actual rendering. The noise engine is used to control all the parameters in the software. Each parameter can be mapped on a given output of the noise engine. The engine does not produces textures but directly works with functions that get compiled into a shader.
“For centuries, Chinese scholars have contemplated the oddly shaped stones that became known as “scholar’s rocks”. Their shapes might evoke ever-changing associations and their surfaces convey a sense of millennia of exposure to nature. Yet it remains unknown to what extent the “natural” shapes of these stones have been manipulated, an artificiality enhanced by the wood or stone pedestals created for them. Their extraordinary beauty and their enigmatic mysteriousness can be seen as a conceptual model for contemporary art practices working on the complex relationship between the authentic and the manipulated – the figurative and the abstract. – Tommaso Franzolini on Captives”
chicagoif:

Captives by @Quayola - CG Geological Formations as Life-Size ‘Unfinished’ Sculptures
Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures by Quayola and a contemporary homage to Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The project explores tensions and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. In this series mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations, endlessly evolving and morphing into classical figures resulting into life-size ‘unfinished’ sculptures.

“In every block of marble I see a statue as plain as though it stood before me, shaped, and perfect in attitude and action. I have only to hew away the rough walls that imprison the lovely apparition to reveal it to the other eyes as mine see it. The best artist has that thought alone which is contained within the marble shell; the sculptor’s hand can only break the spell to free the figures slumbering in the stone. The true work of art is but a shadow of the divine perfection. Michelangelo (1501)”
The project is comprised of a number of different iterations, tools and processes. Starting off with the building models of existing sculptures using zBrush, running them through custom vvvv softwares, exporting and finally producing the physical sculptures milled by a robot. The installation also includes animated scenes, rendered using custom software and finally edited for the video installation sequenced across 6 hd screens with each having its own audio channel.
For this project Quayola wanted to use software that would produce immediate feedback and have a realtime response. Since traditional 3d packages tend to cripple the flow, Quayola wanted something where he could have a “conversation” with the model, a bit like a sculptor would have with clay or stone. There is an action and an immediate response.
The software is built using VVVV through a series of custom nodes and DX11 shaders, and integrated in the Dedalo framework CAN covered about few weeks back. The core code for handling the geometry is done by Matt Swoboda and Juliet Vuillet, while all the system and rendering is done by Natan Sinigaglia (within the Dedalo framework). The software itself runs on two machines, the first handling a noise engine, presets and control for all parameters, while the second is handling the actual rendering. The noise engine is used to control all the parameters in the software. Each parameter can be mapped on a given output of the noise engine. The engine does not produces textures but directly works with functions that get compiled into a shader.
“For centuries, Chinese scholars have contemplated the oddly shaped stones that became known as “scholar’s rocks”. Their shapes might evoke ever-changing associations and their surfaces convey a sense of millennia of exposure to nature. Yet it remains unknown to what extent the “natural” shapes of these stones have been manipulated, an artificiality enhanced by the wood or stone pedestals created for them. Their extraordinary beauty and their enigmatic mysteriousness can be seen as a conceptual model for contemporary art practices working on the complex relationship between the authentic and the manipulated – the figurative and the abstract. – Tommaso Franzolini on Captives”
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disenodelmueble:

Hemos publicado muchos ejemplos de mueble ” minimo desperdicio” ahora más viables por las posibilidades que brinda el CNC. Este es finalista del Salão Design Movelsul en la categoría Estudiantes. Su nombre Banquito Lapa
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telegrafik:

Min|Day
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agalejo:

Lo de hoy ! 👊#InstaSize #trabajandoando #diseño #CNC #celosía  #arquitectura #zerotres @zerotresmx   (en Electric feel || MGMT 🎵)
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jeroenapers:

Een bankje tussen de heggen in het Brusselse Jardin d’Albertine, CNC gesneden ontwerp van de Poolse Paweł Grobelny.
(via Zeutch)
jeroenapers:

Een bankje tussen de heggen in het Brusselse Jardin d’Albertine, CNC gesneden ontwerp van de Poolse Paweł Grobelny.
(via Zeutch)
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instructables:

Custom made Sharpie Holder for a CNC Router by trev25
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captosta:

M3 Coffee table
Coffee table inspired by natural formations found in the vegetable worldJavi Olmeda
captosta:

M3 Coffee table
Coffee table inspired by natural formations found in the vegetable worldJavi Olmeda
captosta:

M3 Coffee table
Coffee table inspired by natural formations found in the vegetable worldJavi Olmeda
captosta:

M3 Coffee table
Coffee table inspired by natural formations found in the vegetable worldJavi Olmeda
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remash:

the grind ~ erica sellers
remash:

the grind ~ erica sellers
remash:

the grind ~ erica sellers
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design-29:

Organic shaped cnc milled objects
design-29:

Organic shaped cnc milled objects
design-29:

Organic shaped cnc milled objects
design-29:

Organic shaped cnc milled objects
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nevver:

Jack Vettriano
nevver:

Jack Vettriano
nevver:

Jack Vettriano
nevver:

Jack Vettriano
nevver:

Jack Vettriano
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nevver:

Paris
nevver:

Paris